Students concerned with latest graduate employment outcomes

Fredericton, NB — The New Brunswick Student Alliance is concerned by the latest employment outcome figures on the graduating Class of 2014.

The figures, released last week by the Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission indicate declines over the past decade in full-time employment and median earnings (in constant dollars) for postsecondary graduates in New Brunswick.

“This represents a very real problem for the province’s ability to retain young people,” said NBSA Board Chair Sara Camus. “An educated, well-paid workforce is the future of New Brunswick and our graduates need to be adequately supported to stay in the province after their studies.”

The drop in the number of recent graduates working in jobs requiring university education or management indicates another worrying trend: the underemployment of young people across the Maritimes.

“Underemployment is a very real issue for recent graduates,” noted Robert Burroughs, NBSA executive director. “Add to that high debt levels and declining wages, and we have the makings of a demographic disaster for New Brunswick.”

The NBSA has previously urged government to address high debt levels — 50 percent higher than the national average — of graduates in New Brunswick by making necessary changes to programs such as the Timely Completion Benefit (TCB). The TCB, a debt relief program, was last modified in 2015 by imposing a higher debt-cap on students.

Burroughs added, “Student loan debt reduction is a component of the government’s Economic Growth Plan and should be: high debt levels are linked with slow economic growth and outmigration. Yet, two years on and the TCB remains unchanged.”

Press Releases

Support for Universities Canada in opposition to US executive order

Today, on behalf of the over 12,000 postsecondary students that we represent at Mount Allison Students’ Union, St. Thomas University Students’ Union, UNB Student Union, and UNB-SRC, the NBSA wrote to New Brunswick’s Members of Parliament, expressing our support for Universities Canada and the Canadian postsecondary sector in opposition to the US executive order.

You may read that letter, addressed to Karen Ludwig, MP and copied to all New Brunswick’s Members of Parliament, here.

This ban runs counter to our central mission of accessibility to postsecondary education in New Brunswick and limits the freedom of mobility of our members. We support calls for the ban to “end as quickly as possible”.

We encourage all of our members to write to New Brunswick’s MPs.

Mail may be sent postage free to this address:

[Name of MP]
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada
K1A 0A4

Contact information by email and phone for New Brunswick’s MPs and their Hill & constituency offices can be found on the Parliament of Canada’s website.

In The Media

Economic Impact Assessment Highlights Value of Universities

Fredericton, NB – An economic impact assessment released by the University of New Brunswick (UNB) has students in the province applauding its recognition of the return on taxpayers’ investment in the post-secondary education system.

The study, which highlighted the positive economic impact of UNB, was undertaken by the university in collaboration with Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI). It found that UNB and its students generated $1.2 billion in added income for the New Brunswick economy in 2013-14, or about 4.5% of the province’s total gross provincial product.

The money was the result of various investments including student spending, start-up companies, and alumni impact.

“The positive economic impact generated by the University of New Brunswick cannot be overstated,“ said Lindsay Handren, NBSA Executive Director. “$1.2 billion is not a small number. Taxpayers’ investment in the post-secondary education system – and primarily, in its students – is generating an extremely positive return.“

While this particular assessment applied only to UNB, similar results could be expected of all four New Brunswick universities. Anticipated cuts to university operating grants in the 2016-17 provincial budget could significantly reduce universities’ overall economic impact as programs, positions, and student supports are eliminated.

New Brunswick currently ranks eighth in Canada in terms of public funding to universities. The 2015-16 provincial budget put a freeze on that funding.

“The University of New Brunswick’s economic impact assessment is further proof of the value of our post-secondary education system,“ said Katie Davey, NBSA Vice-Chair.

“Students and alumni are contributing hundreds of millions of dollars to the provincial economy; an economy that is in trouble. We hope that government will recognize the value of New Brunswick’s universities in preparing the upcoming budget, and that it will support our universities by way of increased operating grants.”

Press Releases